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Not Brentford New

June News

The following have been extracted from the British Newspaper Archive, also accessible through FindMyPast.

There are a few local references which I have emboldened.

Morning Post - Thursday 12 June 1862

ROYAL HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY.
The second grand fete of this society took place yesterday, and was attended, broken weather notwithstanding, with great success. A more numerous or fashionable assemblage has rarely been brought together to acknowledge the attractions of a floral display than that which on this occasion occupied the garden at South Kensington.

The aspect of the morning threatened to interfere with the success of the exhibition ; but though showers fell at intervals during the afternoon, and detracted from the pleasure of the promenade, they seemed to have no effect upon the number of visitors, end only led to a greater amount of homage being paid to the more immediate object of the assemblage.

The wisdom of providing against capricious weather by having the entire show under cover was amply justified by the experience of this as well as of former exhibitions.

A few nights since the large tent in which it was intended that the exhibition should be held was blown down, and the collection, which was most extensive and meritorious, had in consequence to be arranged under the western arcade.

If the visitors wore deprived of the effect which the artistic piling and grouping of such a magnificent display would have had under canvas, they had full compensation in the greater opportunity which was afforded of examining the various classes in detail, and in the vista of brilliant colouring which was presented in the greater space.

In all its departments the exhibition was excellent, the pelargoniums particularly, which were in endless variety, eliciting universal admiration, and feasting the eye with the profuseness and beauty of their blooms. Stove and greenhouse plants, orchids, and other exotics, azaleas, roses in pots, calceolarias, and ornamental plants were all well represented, and were much admired.

Some ingenious implements were shown under the eastern arcade, but the attention bestowed on them by the general company was not proportionate to their usefulness or merits. Military bands were in attendance during the afternoon, and performed a wel1 selected programme. The value of the prizes offered was £546.

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The following is the award of prizes :—
15 Stove and Greenhouse Plants open--1st prize, £20, Mr. T. Whitbread. Dartford: 2d, £15, W. May, gardener to Mr. J. Spode, Rugeley.
12 Stove and Greenhouse Plants (nurserymen). —1st, £10, Messrs. J. and J. Fraser, Lee-bridge-road 2d, £6, Mr. 0. Road, Sydenham-park.
9 Stove and Greenhouse Plants (amateurs).—1st. £9, H. Chillman gardener to Mrs. Smith, Epsom; 2d, £7. J. Green: gardener to Sir E Antrobus, Cheam.
6 Stove and Greenhouse Plants (amateurs).—1st, (equal) : £9, A. Ingram gardener to Mr. J. J. Blandy, Reading: and Mr. T. Page, gardener to Mr. W. Leaf. Streatham; 2d. £4, J. Tegg, gardener to Baron Hambro. Roehampton.
10 Fine Foliaged and Variegated Plants open .-1st. £7. Mr. Hamilton. Arle-court-gardens, Cheltenham ; 2d, £5. Syon Gardens Brentford; 3d, £4, C. Hutt, gardener to to Miss Burdett Coutts. Highgate.
20 Orchids, exotic. species (amateurs).—1st, £20. G. Baker, gardener to Mr. A. Basset, Stamfordhill ; 2d. £15. W. Milford, gardener to Mr. E M Moriand. Haverstock-hill; 3d, £10, B Peed, gardener to Mrs. Tredwell Lower Norwood.
12 Orchids, exotic species (nurserymen).—1st. £10. Messrs. Beitch and Son, CIIelsea and Exeter’ 2d, £7, Mr. B. S. Williams, Holloway; 3d. £5. Mr. S. Walley, Cheshunt.
10 Orchids, exotic species (amateurs) .—1st. £10, C. Penny, gardener to Mr. H. H. Gibbs, Regents-park : 2d, £7, T. Page. gardcher to Mr. W. Leaf, Streatham 6 Orchids. exotic species (amateurs) .-1st. £6, J. Wiggins, gardener to W. Beck, Isleworth.; 2d. £4, J. Green, gardener to Sir E. Antrobus, Cheam.
9 Greenhouse Azaleas, distinct kinds amateurs -2d, £9, Mr. T. Whitbread. Dartford : 3d. £7. W. May gardener to Mr. J. Spode, Rugeley.
9 Greenhouse Azaleas, distinct kinds (nurserymen) .—1st, £7. Mr. C. Turner. Slough: 2d. £51, Messrs. Veitch. Chelsea and Exeter. 6 Azaleas. new kinds sent out since 1857 (open) £3 Messrs. Ivory and Son. Dorking and Reigate.
12 Roses,in pots. distinct kinds (nurserymen).-1st, £10, Messrs. Lane and Son, Berkhamstead ; 2d, £7 Mr. W. Paul, Waltham cross, 6 Roses,in pots distinct kinds (amateur), .—1st, £6, Mr. T. Terry gardener to Mr. C. W. G. Puller, Youngsbury, near Ware.
6 Dracaeas and Cordylines ,open .-1st. “2, Messrs. Veitch and Son. Chelsea and Exeter; 2d £2 Messrs. Jackson and Son, Kingston, Surrey.

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6 Cape Heaths, open .-1st, £5, Mr. B. Peed, gardener to Mrs. Tredwell, Lower Norwood 2d, £3, Mr. T. Page, gardener to Mr. W . Leaf, Streatham.
9 Pelargoniums , distinct kinds (amateurs)—1st, £8, Mr. T. Bailey, Gardener to Mr. T. T. Drake; 2d and 3d. withheld.
12 Pelargoniums , distinct kinds (nurserymen) .—1st, £8, Mr. C. Turner, Slough; 2d, £6 Messrs. Dobson and Sons, Isleworth.
6 Pelargoniums, Fancies, distinct kinds (open) .—1st, £5 Mr. C. Turner, Slough : 2d. £4, Messrs. Dobson and Sons, Isleworth.
9 Pelargoniums, spotted or French distinct (open).—1st, £4. Mr. Turner, Slough ; 2d, £3, Messrs. Dobson and Son, Isleworth.
6 Claceolarias in pots open 1st, £3, Mr. A Bousie, Slough.
12 Exotic Ferns, distinct kinds (open) .—1st, £5, Mr. B. S. Williams. Holloway ; 2d, £4, Mr. H. Lavey, Fetcham.
6 Anaestochiles, or other variegated orchids (open) —1st, £3 Mr. J. Harbott, Stratford.
New or Bare Tender Plants in flower (open).—1st, silver Knightian medal, . Mr. J. Bateman. Dendrobium Falcaneri; 2d, silver Banksian medal, Mr. J Davis, Crinum sp. ; 3d, bronze medal. Messrs. Veitch and Son, Nolana lanceolata.
New and Rare Tender plants not in flower (open) —1st, silver Knightian medal, Messrs. Veitch and Son, Alocasia Zelima; 2d, silver Banksian medal, Messrs. Veitch and Son. Dryopteris sp.; 3d. Bronze medal, Mr. Bull, Orespunax dactyliferum.
New or Rare Hardy Ornamental Plants (open),.—1st, silver Knightian medal, M essrs. Veitch and Son, Retinospora sp.; 2d, silver Banksian medal. Messrs. Veitch and Son. Retinospora squarrosa ; 3d, silver Banksian medal, Messrs. Osborn and Son, Osmunda Regalisa cristata.

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Newly-introduced Plants, 1859-61(open). —1st class certificate, Messrs. Veitch and Son; 2d. ditto, Messrs. Veitch and Son; 3d ditto, Messrs. Veitch and Son.
Seedling Florists’ Flowers and Garden Hybrids.—1st class certificates, Perkins and Son, Mr. Nye, Mr. Wiggins, Mr. G. W. Hoyle, and Messrs. Veitch and Son.
Wardian Case arranged for the Drawing-room-1st prize, £4, Messrs. Veitch and Son, Chelsea and Exeter; 2d £3, Messrs. Veitch and Son.
Miscellaneous (open) .—1st, £2, Messrs. Veitch and Son, Chelsea and Exeter.
Collection of cut Rhododendrons (open) £2, Mr. J.Standish, Bagshot.

MR. DILKE'S SPECIAL PRIZES.
Three Groups of Fruits and Flowers for the dinner table.—1st, £10. Mr. W. 'Thompson, 17, Royal-crescent, Notting-hill ; 2d, £7, Mr. H. Pickering. 42, Prince's-gate.

FRUIT.
Pineapple any variety. – 1st, £3. John Floud, gardener to Mr. R. Fothergill, Aberdare.
Grapes, Black.—1st. £3, Mr. A. Henderson, Trentham-gardens, Stoke-on-Trent.
Grapes, White Muscat.—1st, £3, John Horwood, gardener to Mr. G. H. Turnbull, Bromley.
Grape., White. Any class. – 1st £3, G. Wortley, gardener to Admiral Hon. P. Carey, Norwood.
Peaches. — 1st. £3, Mr. A. Henderson, Trentham-gardens; 2d, £2 F.W. Durrant, gardener to Hon. Colonel Duncombe, St. Neots.
Nectarines.—1st £3, C. Allen, gardener to Mr. J. B. Clegg, Cheshire; 2d, £2 Mr. A. Henderson, Trentham-gardens. Cherries.-1st. £2, Mr A. Henderson. Trentham-gardens.
Strawberries—1st £1 10s. Mr. R. Smith, Twickenham.
Strawberries.—1st, .£2 10s., Mr. R. Smith, Twickenham; 2d £2 Mr. J. . Widdowson: Chorley-wood-house.
Melons Green-fleshed.—1st, £1 10s., Mr. J. Meredith, Vine- cottage. Garston Liverpool.
Melons Scarlet-fleshed.—1st, £1 10s., W. Kaile, gardener to the Earl of Lovelace, Ripley.
Vines in Pots, two plants.-1st. £4, Mr. John Smith, Lyon-gardens (should be Syon?), Brentford; 2d £3, C. Hutt, gardener to Miss Burdett Coutts, Highgate.
Miscellaneous. —1st, £2, Mr. J. Standish, Ascot and Bagshot; 2d £1 10s., Mr. T. Lunt, Greenock. N.B : 2d £1 10s.,Mr. J.H. Trouncer M.D., 6 Mount-street; 2d £1 10s. Mr. A. Henderson, Trentham-gardens.

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IMPLEMENTS.
The following implements were commended by the committee
Class A.—Heating Apparatus &c. – 1. Model of a patented conservatory—Mr. Cranston, Birmingham. 2. A six feet boiler —Mr Ormston, Chelsea. 3. A hot air ventilator- Mr Thompson, Dalkeith commended as leading to useful results . 4. Doors and panels for boiler pedestal for heating halls etc’.—Messrs. Weeks, Chelsea.
Class B.—Garden machines.-1. Water ballasting adjustable garden rollers- Messrs. Amitt and Beresford, Peterborough. 2. Lawn o mowing machine—Messrs. Brown. Cannon-street, W. 3. Mowing machines – highly commended —Mr. Green, Holborn-hill; 4 Mowing machines – Messrs. Kennard, Dublin
Class C.—Garden Tools. Cutlery. &c.—l. Fruit and flower gatherers—Messrs. Barr and Sugden, Coventry (priced too highly)
Class D - Garden Ornaments in Wirework. —1. A collection of vases &c.. —Messrs Brown, Cannon-street W. 2. A collection of garden ornaments—Mr. Jones. Bankside. 3. Galvanised flower baskets .—Mr. Banks, Liverpool.
Class E.—Garden Pottery. &c.—l. Garden sticks and labels Mr Haage, Erfurt. Prussia. 2. Garden labels—Messrs. Betham and Blackith, Lower Thames-street. 3. Large garden pots— Mr. Phillips, Weston-super-Mare.
Class F —Implements for Watering. Protecting, &c.-1. flower pot covers -Messrs. Barr and Sugden. 2. Watering engines-Mr. Read, Regent-circus, Piccadilly-. 3. Tree guards —Mr. Banks. 4. Water barrows—Mr. Nixey, Slough.

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The following item was sufficiently novel to be included in 26 newspapers between June 11th and 22nd, including the Bucks Herald, Luton Times and Advertiser, Dundee Courier, Shields Daily Gazette, Shipping and Mercantile Gazette - London, Staffordshire Advertiser, Yorkshire Post and Leeds Intelligencer, The Era - London, Carlisle Patriot, Fife Herald, South Wales Daily News, Sheffield Daily Telegraph, Western Gazette - Yeovil, Dover Express.

Chelmsford Chronicle - Friday 14 June 1872

NOVEL APPLICATION - On Monday George Hyde, coke dealer, of Running Horses-yard, Brentford, came before the magistrates on crutches, and asked for a summons, stating that his wife absconded on the previous Thursday morning, while he was in bed, taking with her, among other things, his wooden leg. He was unable to carry on his business in consequence, and wished to recover his leg. The summons was granted.

Research notes

The 1871 census of The Square, St Paul's parish, includes George Hyde, 50, coke dealer, born Newbury Berkshire, with his wife Mary Ann age 40, presumably the lady who ran off with his leg. She was Brentford-born and living with her were three of her children, surname apparently Shawell but see following notes, the youngest, Charlotte, being one year old. A search for their marriage located a likely entry in the second quarter of 1871: George Hyde to Mary Ann SHARVELL, Brentford Registration District.

Fortunately full marriage details are available on ancestry and show the couple married by banns at St Paul's Old Brentford on 3rd June 1871 (ie a few weeks after the census in which they were recorded as man and wife). Both lived in St Paul's parish and George described himself as 50, a widower, a hawker and the son of Alban Hyde, (deceased) carpenter. Mary Ann Sharvell was 41 and a widow, the daughter of Charles YOUNG (deceased), also a carpenter. The marriage was witnessed by John NORTH and 'Marthr' WAITE and all parties signed the register, though George's signature was not a confident one.

A check of births in Middlesex shows Mary Ann's surname was recorded in a range of forms between 1851 and 1871: Shervill, Shirvell, Shirvall, Sherville, Shervell, Shirvel, Sharvell and Shervall.

The 1861 census shows Mary Ann with her previous husband living in a cottage on Heath Lane, Isleworth. Her husband was Charles Sharvell, who was aged 35 and a labourer born in New Romney, Kent. They had four children at the time of the census including Charles age 7: in the1871 census he was with his mother and George Hyde, age 17, which points to this being the relevant entry. Charles senior was buried 'in front of the church' at Hounslow on 11th September 1864 at the age of 38 (original burial register for Hounslow Heath on ancestry.

In 1861 George Hyde, age 41, was living at 56 High Street and was a fishmonger - read more about this trade. His wife Mary was 42 and also from Berkshire: Bridgewaltham, probably Bright Waltham. There is a local burial that may be that of Mary although she is older than expected: Mary Ann Hyde buried in the new burial ground of Ealing, 29th May 1864, age 52. She was of Old Brentford.

I suspect some of you are interested in what happened after George's second wife left with his leg. Having got this far I was keen to get to an end point. In George's case this was in the third quarter of 1878 when he died at the age of 58. His second wife Mary Ann was ten years younger than George and the 1881 census shows her living in Back Lane, Chiswick, age 51, a widowed charwoman. Living with her were her daughter Charlotte, age 11 and a younger daughter Annie age 9, both girls scholars and Brentford-born.

At first I could not locate Mary Ann in the 1891 census: a Mary Ann Hyde in the workhouse nearly fitted but this Mary Ann was born in Brompton and was single. Nor was there a good match in the death registrations. However a search of marriages suggested she may have found a third husband, Thomas SIMCOX. The 1891 census shows the couple living at 6 Caroline Place, Albany Road Brentford; Thomas was 61 and a bricklayer born in Diddlebury, Shropshire and Mary Ann was also 61. Sharing the same house were William and Charlotte ARMITAGE, he a 25 year old labourer, and she aged 22: the marriage of William to Charlotte Hyde in the second quarter of 1888 in BrentfordRegistration District confirms this is the correct family.

Evidence to date points to Mary Ann being a survivor, so I half-expected her to be alive in 1901; however no entry matched. Her daughter Charlotte and husband William Armitage were living at Distillery Road with their three children; William was a labourer for the gas works, work which sounds reasonably secure. A census search leaving the surname blank found Thomas and Mary Ann indexed as LIMCOX; they were both 71 and living at 6 Woodings Cottages, Back Lane, Turnham Green, the home of George and Annie SALMON and their four children. Thomas and Mary Ann were recorded as George Salmon's in-laws, and George's wife Annie, age 27, is most probably the Annie who was living with her mother in 1881, age 9. Thomas Simcox was still working as a bricklayer at the age of 71.

Mary Ann lived a further five years after the 1901 census, dying at the age of 77. Her death was registered in the second quarter of 1906 at Brentford.

There are some public family trees on ancestry which include some references to Mary Ann YOUNG, as she was originally named.

The above does not clarify what happened to George Hyde's leg; perhaps a family descendant knows more...

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Published June 2012; updated June 2017