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Brentford Councillors - George Band

Introduction

Janet McNamara has researched details of the men who served as Brentford Local Board Members and Councillors, see intro page for more details of early local government structure.

George Band

George Band was a local Councillor in the late 19th and early 20th century.

His name is on the foundation stones at Brentford Baths (1895) and the Fire Station (1897).

There is a one inch thick bound history of the Band family and the two Brentford tanning companies at Chiswick Library (reference 920 Band) written by Georgeís grandson. It seems that Georgeís father and grandfather had started in business in Walworth and moved to Brentford in 1859. This was James Band & Sons who manufactured parchments and leather used for lining hats, cheaper quality shoes and upholstery in Boston Road. This company, it seems ran into difficulties when the Government started using paper rather than parchment for official documents about 1910.

Another branch of the family was in business in Plough Yard off the High Street near the canal.

The 1851 census when George was 3 months old shows 2 households at 23, Charles Street, Newington, Lambeth. Martin Band was 30 and a parchment maker, his wife Jane Catherine and son Henry (6) and daughter Jane 5 months. The other household was James (27), a parchment maker with his wife Rebecca, son James and George 3 months.

The familysearch website shows Martin and James were both baptised in Coventry both with parents Joseph and Susannah.

Both Martin and James both moved to Brentford with Martin off the High Street and James in Boston Road. They were both in the same trade but from the early 20th century no contact between them.

By 1861 James was a Parchment Maker in Brentford employing 2 men and the family of James (36) and born in Warwickshire, Rebecca (46), James (13), George (11), Rebecca (8) and Joseph (6) were living at 2, Landsdowne Cottages 2 doors from the Kings Arms in Boston Road.

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In 1871 George was a separate household at 21 York Street, Newington and was a Leather Dresser. James Snr and jnr were next door to the Kings Arms as parchment makers.

By 1881 George was married to Louisa YOUNG (23) living at 21, York Street, Newington with a 1 year old daughter, Edith. His brother James had moved from Brentford and was a leather dresser living near St Neots.

In 1891 George and Louisa were living at 11, Hamilton Road, Brentford with Edith (11), Winifred (6), George (5), Edward (4), Dorothy (2) and Harold 10 months. The 5 youngest children had been born in Brentford. Winifred at 60, Hamilton Road the others at number 11.

His father was retired by this census and was living at Glenhurst House, which was 51, Glenhurst Road next to the factory with his daughter Rebecca (39), son Joseph (35) who was a parchment maker and Marguerite Kelly (28) a visitor.

By 1901 George (50) and Louisa (43) had moved to 12, Boston Road, next door to Edwin Underwood with Edith (21), George (15), Edward (14) and Harold (10). They employed a general servant aged 14. The house was called Fairseat.

Harold later married in to the Underwood family.

During the 1880s George was a well known player with Boston Park Cricket Club and won several of their annual trophies. He was also a member of Surrey CC as was Edwin Underwood.

The parchment company seems to have gone bankrupt in 1910 and during the First World War he was living at 149a Windmill Road where he died in October 1919.

He was buried in South Ealing Cemetery where his son was interred in 1931 and his wife in 1947.

Thereís a suggestion in the family history in Chiswick Library that James Band was a member of the Local Board in 1893/4 but I havenít found a mention of him. (JM)

Other material

Janet has also provided photos from his time of serving as a councillor (1894, 1897 and 1900) and examples of his signature. To be added as time permits.

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Page published September 2011